Some recent podcasts

I wanted to call attention to four good podcasts that I listened to recently. The first is from IT Conversations and the Interviews with Innovators series hosted by Jon Udell. In this one, he speaks with Raymond Yee of UC Berkeley, discussing mashups. I especially liked to discussion about public events, and getting feeds from the local YMCA. I always wind up putting in all my kids games into iCal from their various sports teams, it would be great if I could simply subscribe from somewhere on the internet. Jon himself called out the emphasis on this in the podcast in his own blog.

The next two are both from Dana Gardner’s Briefings Direct series. The first was a panel discussion from his aptly-renamed Analyst’s Insight series (it used to be SOA Insights when I was able to participate, but even then, the topics were starting to go beyond SOA), that discussed the recent posts regarding SOA and WOA. It was an interesting listen, but I have to admit, for the first half of the conversation, I was reminded of my last post. Throughout the discussion, they kept implying that SOA was equivalent to adopting SOAP and WS-*, and then using that angle to compare it to “WOA” which they implied was the least common denominator of HTTP, along with either POX or REST. Many people have picked up on one comment which I believe was from Phil Wainewright, who said, “WOA is SOA that works.” Once again, I don’t think this was a fair characterization. First off, if we look at a company that is leveraging a SaaS provider like Salesforce.com, Salesforce.com is, at best, a service provider within their SOA. If the company is simply using the web-based front end, then Salesforce.com isn’t even a service provider in their SOA, it’s an application provider. Now, you can certainly argue that services from Amazon and Google are service providers, and that there’s some decent examples of small companies successfully leveraging these services, we’re still a far cry away from having an enterprise SOA that works, whichever technology you look at. So, I was a bit disappointed in this part of the discussion. The second half of the discussion got into the whole Microhoo arena, which wound up being much more interesting, in my opinion.

The second one from Dana was a sponsored podcast from HP, with Dana discussing their ISSM (Information Security Service Management) approach with Tari Schreider. The really interesting thing in this one was to hear about his concept of the 5 P’s, which was very familiar to me, because the first three were People, Policies, and Process (read this and this). The remaining two P’s were Products and Proof. I’ve stated that products are used to support the process, if needed, typically making it more efficient. Proof was a good addition, which is basically saying that you need a feedback loop to make sure everything is doing what you intended it to. I’ll have to keep this in mind in my future discussions.

The last one is again from IT Conversations, this time from the O’Reilly Open Source Conference Series. It is a “conversation” between Eben Moglen and Tim O’Reilly. If nothing else, it was entertaining, but I have to admit, I was left thinking, “What a jerk.” Now clearly, Eben isn’t a very smart individual, but just as he said that Richard Stallman would have come across as to ideological, he did the exact same thing. When asked to give specific recommendations on what to do, Eben didn’t provide any decent answer, instead he said, “Here’s your answer: you’ve got another 10 years to figure it out.”

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